MIKE GULLIVER

Deaf geographies, and other worlds.

A home for the banquets, part 2

Just pre-Christmas… I’ve finally decided what to do with the Banquets documents…

Despite offers of help from friends with software for cataloguing and archival control, the project’s not really that kind of thing… When each piece of work is completed, it will be… but in the meantime, it’s more an ongoing exploration of the issues surrounding translation and the historical record – but one that actually produces a finished body of work (as finished as it can be given the open-endedness of historical research.

Anyway…

Essentially, the main tension was the need to able to translate and invite comment on the translation on the one hand, and the fact that I’d like to be able to comment… and also blog about other things on the other.

So, the DEAF history translation website has come into being… at http://deafhistorytranslations.wordpress.com/

This will now act as home for the Banquets as they are translated… and for future translations by me or/and others.

What I’ll be doing is translating the Banquets on that site, making versions available via Scribd, and allowing comments… I’ll also use that site for historical and textual information (almost as if I was writing a book – which, I suppose, I am… kind of).

This site will continue to be used for my own commentary on the project, and for other posts.

And with that… and the news that I’ll be continuing to translate the Banquets after the Christmas break… Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year…

 

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This entry was posted on December 23, 2010 by in DEAF, DEAF history and tagged .
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